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Meet the Chauhans of Nadol

Chauhans of Nadol: A Rajput Dynasty of Marwar

The Chauhans of Nadol, also known as the Chahamanas of Naddula, were a Rajput dynasty that ruled the Marwar region of Rajasthan from the 10th to the 12th century CE.

They were an offshoot of the Shakambhari Chahamana dynasty, and their capital was Naddula (present-day Nadol). They expanded their kingdom through wars and alliances with the neighbouring kingdoms of the Paramaras, the Chaulukyas, the Ghaznavids, and the Chahamanas of Shakambhari.

They also built several temples and monuments, including the famous temple of Ashapura Mata, their clan deity. Their last ruler, Jayata-simha, was defeated by the Ghurid Empire general Qutb al-Din Aibak in 1197 CE.

Chauhan Kings in Nadol

The following table lists the names and reigns of the Chauhan kings of Nadol, along with their notable achievements and events.

NameReignAchievements and Events
Lakshmana (Lakha)c. 950-980 CEThe founder of the dynasty, he was a son of the Shakambhari Chahamana king Vakpatiraja I.

He established his rule over Nadol with the help of the Brahmanas of the town, who hired him to protect them from the Medas, a tribe of freebooters.

He also built the temple of Ashapura Mata, the clan deity of the Chauhans.
Shobhitac. 980-1000 CEHe was a son of Lakshmana, and succeeded him as the king of Nadol.

He defeated the ruler of Arbuda (modern – Mount Abu), who probably belonged to a Paramara branch.
Balirajac. 1000-1020 CEHe was a son of Shobhita, and succeeded him as the king of Nadol.

He fought against the Paramara king Munja, with both the sides claiming victory.

He probably died without an heir, and was succeeded by his uncle Vigrahapala.
Vigrahapalac. 1020-1024 CEHe was a younger son of Lakshmana, and succeeded his nephew Baliraja as the king of Nadol.
Mahinduc. 1024-1028 CEHe was a son of Vigrahapala, and succeeded him as the king of Nadol.

He helped the Hastikundi Rashtrakuta prince Dhavala against the Shakambhari Chahamana king Durlabharaja.
Ashvapalac. 1028-1032 CEHe was a son of Mahindu, and succeeded him as the king of Nadol.
Ahilac. 1032-1036 CEHe was a son of Ashvapala, and succeeded him as the king of Nadol.

He seems to have repulsed an invasion by the Chaulukya king Bhima I.

He probably died without an heir, and was succeeded by his uncle Anahilla.
Anahillac. 1036-1055 CEHe was a younger son of Mahindu, and succeeded his nephew Ahila as the king of Nadol.

He was one of the most successful rulers of the dynasty, and greatly expanded the kingdom.

He defeated the Chaulukya king Bhima, captured Shakambhari, killed the Paramara king Bhoja’s general Sadha, and defeated the Turushkas (Turkic people).
Balaprasadac. 1055-1060 CEHe was a son of Anahilla, and succeeded him as the king of Nadol.
Jendrarajac. 1060-1080 CEHe was a son of Anahilla, and succeeded his brother Balaprasada as the king of Nadol.

He appears to have defeated a Chaulukya ruler, either Bhima I or his successor Karna.
Prithvipalac. 1080-1090 CEHe was a son of Jendraraja, and succeeded him as the king of Nadol.
Jojalladevac. 1090-1100 CEHe was a son of Jendraraja, and succeeded his brother Prithvipala as the king of Nadol.
Asharajac. 1100-1120 CEHe was a son of Jendraraja, and succeeded his brother Jojalladeva as the king of Nadol.
Alhanc. 1120-1140 CEHe was a son of Asharaja, and succeeded him as the king of Nadol.

He fought against the Ghaznavid invasions, and allied with the Chaulukya king Kumarapala against the Paramara king Jayasimha.
Arhanc. 1140-1160 CEHe was a son of Alhan, and succeeded him as the king of Nadol.

He continued the alliance with the Chaulukyas, and supported Kumarapala’s successor Ajayapala against the Paramara king Vindhyavarman.
Kelhanc. 1160-1180 CEHe was a son of Arhan, and succeeded him as the king of Nadol.

He maintained friendly relations with the Chaulukyas, and helped Ajayapala’s successor Mularaja II against the Paramara king Arjunavarman.
Jayata-simhac. 1180-1197 CEHe was a son of Kelhan, and succeeded him as the king of Nadol.

He was the last ruler of the dynasty, and was defeated by the Ghurid Empire general Qutb al-Din Aibak in 1197 CE.

Temple of Ashapura Mata

The temple of Ashapura Mata is one of the most prominent landmarks of Nadol, and a major pilgrimage site for the Chauhans and other Rajputs of the region.

The temple was built by the first Chauhan king of Nadol, Lakshmana, in the 10th century CE. He dedicated the temple to Sakambhari Devi, the clan deity of the Shakambhari Chahamanas, who had blessed him with the rule over Nadol.

The goddess came to be known as Ashapura Mata, meaning the one who fulfills the hopes. The temple is built in the Nagara style of architecture, and has a sanctum, a mandapa, and a shikhara.

The temple also has several sculptures and inscriptions, depicting the history and legends of the Chauhans.

Conclusion

The Chauhans of Nadol were a powerful and influential Rajput dynasty that ruled the Marwar region for over two centuries. They were known for their military prowess, cultural patronage, and religious devotion.

They left behind a rich legacy of art, architecture, and literature, which can be seen in their capital Nadol and other places. They were also instrumental in resisting the foreign invasions and preserving the Rajput identity and pride.

They are remembered as one of the glorious dynasties of Rajasthan and India.

Next, Chauhans of Jalore extracted from nadol and continued their generation of chauhan.

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